NEWS

World Championships Reflection: Showing My Colors

By Chatten Hayes   

 
There’ll be many flags on display beginning this week at the World Handball Championships in Minneapolis. National colors will fly, and be worn proudly, while some will represent loyalties of players and fans from specific counties, and even particular cities.

Then there will be colors that have personal meaning, such as the Teal that’s now part of my daily look.

You see, every cancer has a color. Who knew? I didn’t, I Googled it and ended up at ChooseHope.com, one of many websites selling a rainbow of supportive accessories. Most people are aware of pink ribbons for breast cancer, and yellow wrist bands declaring it’s possible to live strong with any cancer. My particular journey with ovarian cancer is represented by teal. There’s even an acronym in the community: Treat Early And Live. Most ovarian cancers are found in the late stages and become very difficult to treat.

I’m getting more involved in service to others with cancer and cancer agencies as I approach the one-year anniversary of my surgery on September first. Linked below is the second feature I wrote for the National Ovarian Cancer Coalition (ovarian.org). Read carefully – you might even see the word “handball” in there! And comments from Portland’s Dr. Bob Gill, who is living with gioblastoma.

Hanging around the Championship courts in Minnesota, show your loyalties in every way and we’ll share a laugh. I’ll have on some teal, but I have a Team USA red, white and blue pedicure too.

READ MORE HERE:  http://ovarian.org/component/content/article/33/501


 


Quite enough can happen in just one day.  What about 3,175 of them? Almost nine years ago, Jay Maxwell, Tom Hussey and I were preparing for the start of the 2009 World Handball Championships at the Multnomah Athletic Club in Portland, Ore. I emphasize the start because it was a heck of a run-up. A bit like settlers crossing the Great Plains, watching and watching the Rocky Mountains never get any closer, suddenly we were “in the foothills” at last. Now. Oh, good heavens, now!

In the fall of 2004, not long after hosting a successful and popular national four-wall event, loyal and dedicated MAC handball folks gathered and thought, “Hey, maybe the next U.S. worlds would be doable.”      I remember we drew up a pro/con grid that day, the kind I made when choosing between less elaborate competing choices, like buying designer earrings:

     Pros: Pretty and desired.
     Cons: Expensive and unnecessary?

Come to think of it, in autumn 2004, perhaps those lists resembled one another!

During that long run-up, complications took root and grew. Waterford Crystal, which provided exquisite signature trophies for the world championships beginning in County Clare in 1994, ceased production. I visited Ireland and met with a very kind former employee at the closed Waterford factory. Noel Power supplied many thousands of dollars of product from remaining stock so Portland 2009 didn’t have to break the tradition of presenting world-class crystal to champions.
The MAC leadership changed too. Administrators who in 2004 and ’05 excitedly permitted and supported such a long horizon for a very involved event were gone from the club. Some plans became more complex under new club direction.
Additionally, by 2009, many economies had experienced enormous downturns. Global issues impacted daily activities. Yet our committee of 27 chairmen had held the grand vision and love of the event and each other for years. We just kept working.

“I thought it was a fabulous experience,” Maxwell said recently. “I still think it’s probably the best worlds that’s ever been put on.”

A breathtaking moment occurred on a summer Saturday close to the entry deadline. A committee member logged on to the website and saw entries, which had barely been trickling through the system, beginning to pour in. We called and emailed each other in disbelief throughout the day: “Are you seeing this?” “It can’t be real, right?” “Is it a computer error?”

I suppose all of us realized, just then, that we had indeed been holding our collective breath. Ultimately, our efforts created a world championships that welcomed 993 players from 10 countries for 12 days.
“The success was attributable to a fantastic facility and an amazing team of volunteers,” Hussey says today.

Now all the moving parts of hosting the worlds are back in our country, with the Minneapolis tournament’s needs expanded again by the growth of one very important aspect. One-wall handball changes dramatically each time the event is staged.

In 1994 the cheerful and persistent Irish one-wall organizer, Tom O’Connor, called it “the funny games,” and just a wee number of players arrived in County Clare from countries like Finland. A few Eton fives specialists appeared from England with peculiar gloves and strange rules and customs but no shortage of cheer.

O’Connor can be proud of that start. By 1997 the Winnipeg worlds committee built two side-by-side outdoor courts for the tournament. Mayor Susan Ann Thompson and host chair Bob Pruden produced a grand opening media event, and the walls were emblazoned with the spectacular and creative 1997 logo, my personal favorite of all time. Later years placed courts inside hockey rinks and gymnasiums, and the construction of multiple courts by Dublin in 2012 was the most visible and central setting for one-wall ever attempted.

Anyhow, nine years can make a hell of a difference indeed. I am so glad I’m not in the center! I’ve got other stuff going on, as many of my handball family are aware. Unlike October 2009 (and for years ahead of it), when I ate, slept, wept, sweated and dreamt handball, since September 2017 I’ve had the luxury to put all my energy into well-being and recovery from surgery and chemo for ovarian cancer. I’ve moved into survivorship and am evaluating what the journey has meant and will mean throughout my long life, including the unknowns.

But we all have unknowns. This may seem like a grim example, but when I was in treatment I read that a woman who survived the Las Vegas massacre was killed by a drunken driver a month later. Her story gives me a certain strength. I delight in each day because I’ve got a boatload to do, and I’m ready to devote my energy, passion and charisma to new things.

As you read this, handballers from every section of our sport will be in Minneapolis cheering friends, family and our U.S. dream team … and I’m not just talking about our great players in one-wall, four-wall and wallball. I’m talking about Steve Johnson and his crew of sponsors, administrators, facility directors, loved ones and everyone making this come together for us.

You can cheer at the courts and wave flags and have fun … and please, pat every single one of the hosts on the back as you go by. They’ve earned it!


 

What time is it? I’m journaling with morning coffee so … for Joe Santilli in Australia, it’s the wee hours of morning. Tomorrow.

Oh, sweet Joe. At the 2015 World Handball Championships, he gave me a pen, knowing I love writing. When using it, I think about Joe, Donna, and their sons. I hope we’ll all meet up in Minnesota.

I know many players who show up at the World Championships with a few simple gifts for friends and friends-to-be. Some are based on long knowledge of the recipient, like my pen; others seem cannily intuitive. At my first World Championships, in Phoenix 1991, a Japanese woman player, Kumiko, presented me with a tiny ceramic white kitty sleeping in a ball. I can’t remember who won our match, but I’ve still got the kitty.

As a host committee co-chair in 2009, I was showered with magnificent presents, among them a handsome lacquered box from the Japanese team. Irish friends and administrators brought me a number of lovely gifts, including a buttery-soft violet wool scarf from County Wicklow.

Globes were a theme that year. Bill Kelly, who’s shared desks, dinners, laughs and lamentations with me over many years, gave me an incredible globe which spins with light. It rests on an engraved pedestal commemorating the tournament.

Another globe came my way from Down Under that year, this one a delicate Swarovski crystal orb from Vic DiLuzio.

Ranger Russell seems determined to ensure that I have plenty of his adopted country’s national gear. I can now cheer for him in a shirt (2009) and snazzy ball cap (2015) in Belgium’s bold heraldic colors of red, black and yellow, both items embroidered with my name

Luxurious customized gifts are not necessary, of course. But bringing along a few goodies is fun and meaningful, often many years after the tournament.

Some “gifts” can be shared more than exchanged. I pick up a few picture postcards of my hometown – and Portland, not lacking anything for scenery, has a lot choose from – to show new tournament friends where I hail from. Another way to create special memories is recycling gear from bursting drawers and closets. Handball t-shirts get exchanged formally at some events and informally at others, and it’s fun to wear the rare ones back at the hometown courts.

Many souvenirs are easily tucked in luggage, airport security friendly, and not bulky for new friends to carry home. I can pick up inexpensive Oregon-themed buttons, magnets, keyrings, luggage tags and bookmarks nearly everywhere. In addition, some products are both portable and boldly local: Oregon Rain lip balms are going in my bag, and a few lightweight wooden Christmas ornaments, from Made in Oregon stores.

Journaling with Joe’s gift reminds me that, as I’m preparing for my 10th World Handball Championships, it’s time to pack more than clothes and cosmetics. In Minneapolis, I’ll be ready to present and receive small tokens of enduring friendships with my extended handball family. Travel safely, and see you there!

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2018 USHA Women's Classic & Southwest Regionals

AUSTIN, Texas -- A determined Suzanne Koehler (hitting) beat Jennifer Schmitt in the final of the Women's Classic.  Koehler said she was looking forward to the rematch on the same court from two years ago.  Everyone got lots of play in the triple drop down. 

The Men's Open semis featured current vs. former Collegiate stars with Adam Bernhard facing Max Langmack and Memo Pallares versus Sam Esser.  The elders won again as Esser admitted: "We've been coming here for four years and trying to beat those guys."  Bernhard held on to his title but not without a tussle. Pallares took the first game and garnered 9 in the tiebreaker.

Follow the results at the tournament's R2sports site HERE.

 

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2018 Armed Forces Memorial Day Handball Tournament

TUCSON -- The top pro players delivered another incredible final to wrap up the final day of action in the 2018 Armed Forces Memorial Day Handball Tournament.  Killian Carroll came away with a slam, defeating Sean Lenning 21-17, 21-15 in the singles, then teaming with Abe Montijo to drop Armando Ortiz and Braulio Ruiz in the doubles, 21-1, 21-20. 

Both Carroll and Lenning dazzled the Tucson Racquet Club gallery, delighting the glass-pounding fans with a fast-paced two-game slug fest.  While Lenning kept pace with Carroll through each game, he couldn't break away with big enough runs to stop his opponent's momentum.  See the finals video courtesy of the WPH HERE.

In the Women's Open final, Ashley Moler looked solid against an improving Beth Blackstone, winning the title, 21-8, 21-5.

Before the Saturday night banquet began, the United States Marine Corp Color Guard presented the flag while the Pledge Allegiance to the Flag was recited. The Marine Corps Color Guard is four-member formation – consisting of the senior Marine and Color Sergeant carrying the National Colors, a Marine carrying the Marine Corps Colors, and two rifle bearers.  After dinner Fred Lewis and Vince San Angelo presented awards to division winners, thanked the players and paid tribute to our Armed Forces and the service members who paid the ultimate sacrifice defending our country.  University of Arizona Police Sergeant Alex Garcia played "Taps" to close the banquet and ceremonies.  

Players from 11 states and Mexico came to compete in the 2018 Armed Forces Memorial Day Handball Tournament at Tucson Racquet Club.  The event pays tribute to service members who have given their lives defending our country as well as honors veterans who have served.  Six WPH R48Pro players entered a stellar Open Singles draw of 16.  After two days of exciting play, Killian Carroll and Sean Lenning will meet in Sunday's championship match. 

There were no upsets leading up to the final, although Lenning survived a close game one loss to win a tiebreaker against the Collegiate champion Leo Canales, (19-21), 21-5, 11-5.  In other quarterfinal action, Armando Ortiz stopped Abe Montijo (16-21), 21-17, 11-5. 

In the semifinals, Carroll and Ortiz battled closely in game one before the two-time defending champion closed out the match, 21-16, 21-3. In the other semifinal, Lenning jumped up early on Dave Fink in order to hold off any comeback hope, winning 21-10, 21-16.

In Women's Open action, Ashley Moler will face Beth Blackstone in tomorrow's Women's Open singles final. 

See draws and results HERE.

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2018 USHA National Masters Doubles & WPH R48Pro 7 #5



HOUSTON -- Dan Zimet was one for two on Sunday, dropping this 40 final to Joe Harris and George Garcia Jr. while paired with his brother after winning the 45s with Andy Schad.

The Munsons stopped powerhouses Mattioni and Piexoto in two games to defend their 35 title.  The teamwork for Mike and Dave was a big factor in the win over the first-time partners.  George Garcia Jr. and Joe Harris are the team to beat in the 40s after beating the Zimet brothers (Adam and Dan).  Andy Schad and Dan Zimet edged cousins Chris and Mike McDonald in the 45s.  Mike Wells and John Stoffel beat Jeff Wall and Brett Cooper for the 50s.  William Cervantes and Mark Zamora edged Marty Clemens and Dave McElwain in the 55s.  Lloyd Garcia earned his 10th Masters Title and Grand Master sweater when he and Gary Scogin beat Tom Fitzwater and Mike Linnik in the 60s. Bob Lohmueller got hot in the 65s, teaming with Vance McInnis to beat Greg Sizemore and Chuck Reeve.  Jay Capell got hot in the first game of the 70s over Dave Hinkleman and Bob Bardwell and then had to hang on to win the second with Alan Sherrill.  Gary Rohrer and Ron Cole were on top of their game in winning the 75s over Don Civerolo and Jim Smith.  And the new 80s pairing of Mike Driscoll and Jerry White turned back Lew Buckingham and Ben Marguglio for the title.

Killian Carroll roared back from a large second-game deficit to win the WPH pro title over Sean Lenning in an overtime finish, 15-1, 16-14.  Carroll wanted this win after falling to Lennning’s dramatic comeback in the most recent stop in Las Vegas.


See the final draws HERE.

See the broadcast schedule below (CLICK FOR LARGER IMAGE).

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Lake Forest Fetes 50 years of Dau and Handball

LAKE FOREST, Ill. -- Lake Forest College Handball Coach Mike Dau told the 180 former players and supporters assembled how the 50 years of handball and 51 national titles started. The crowd had assembled from far and wide, from Suhn Lee coming from South Korea, Mike Bargman from Israel and inaugural team member Steve Jamron flying in from the Virgin Islands.  Coach, as he’s affectionately and respectfully called said: “In 1964, Athletic Director Nick Wasylick came to me and said the college would be building a new sports center. I went out on a limb and told him if he built a couple of handball courts, I’d field a handball team. Nick put three courts in, so I had to deliver.”

Dau had already done his homework, and knew he needed to recruit handball players to get off to a good start since it’s a longer road to bring non-players to a competitive level right from the start. Mike brought in the Yee brothers, Wes and Willie, from New York and Dave Smith and Steve Jamron from St. Louis. Those four started a great tradition of headlines for “tiny Lake Forest College” taking on the likes of The University of Texas, Memphis State, and other big-name institutions.

Since those early days of just four players, the team has grown and everyone is welcome. Coach still travels to the national junior tournaments and recruits but he also invites LFC students who didn’t know of handball before Lake Forest. When women were included in the collegiate program and scoring in the ‘80s, scores counted for the top 6 men and the top 6 women. LFC’s team size is about double that these days to encourage participation and improvement over the four-years of collegiate eligibility.

As that first group of four earned LFC’s first title (a tie with University of Texas), Dau had some clout as he recruited and his next recruiting class grew to a group of 10 with new members coming every year and not waiting for the four-year turnovers to occur. That’s the same time that team sizes grew to new scoring that counted more players.

While Dau also served as Athletic Director and football coach throughout his tenure at LFC, he’s been the only mainstay for the handball team that meets at different times to accommodate the large numbers on the three courts.

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66th USHA National Collegiate Championships




TEAM SCORES

Combined Scores  Men's Scores Women's Scores

 

INDIVIDUAL SCORES

Men's Scores Women's Scores

 

SPRINGFIELD, Mo. -- For the first time in modern USHA Collegiate Championships history, a team title was decided on the final day pending the results of the Men's Open Singles final.  Juan Canales (Lake Forest) and Sam Esser (Missouri State) held the fate of the Men's Team title in their hands with the result of their singles final.  The pair displayed the weekend's best handball and pure class through three games.  Splitting the first two games 21-16, Esser held a 3-0 lead in the tiebreaker but couldn't pull away.  Canales kept coming and ultimately took the lead; however, Esser didn't go quietly, forcing long rallies before falling 11-8 in front of a packed house.  With the win (and some help in another division), Lake Forest edged Missouri State for the Men's title.  That result didn't effect the Combined Team title, which Missouri State clinched on Saturday.  

In the Men's Doubles final, Esser and Max Langmack had too much firepower as they cruised to victory, defeating Canales and Ricardo Palmas, 21-8, 21-5.

Dublin City's Fiona Tully slammed the Women's Open events, defeating DCU teammate Meadhbh Ni Dhalaigh in the singles final, 21-8, 21-7.  The Open finalists teamed together to defeat Missouri State's Taylor Rumping and Christina Pecaut in the Women's Open Doubles final, 21-7, 21-2.

USHA President LeaAnn Martin with USHA Coach of the Year Tommy Burnett.

At the Collegiate Championship Banquet on Saturday, Tommy Burnett was honored with the USHA Coach of the Year Award.  USHA President LeaAnn Martin presented the award to Burnett who thanked his family, fellow coaches, volunteers and the handball players who helped make his program a success.    

The USHA also awarded John C. Sabo Sr. Scholarships to Julie Huestis of Pacific University and Chandler Straw of Lake Forest.

Martin with Sabo Scholarship recipients Chandler Straw and Julie Huestis with USHA's Matt Krueger.

This is the first National Collegiates hosted on the courts since they were dedicated as the Dr. Thomas Burnett Handball Courts back in November.   The refinished courts named for the Hall of Fame coach looked pristine as they were refinished and ready for the tournament.  

The USHA Collegiate National Championships offer a unique format where each player is guaranteed three matches.  The first two matches determine final division placement (Open, A, B, etc.).  The third match (and beyond if player advances)  determine points scored for their team.  See the updated draws and results below.  Team results will be posted once scores are confirmed.

Please Note:  Draws updated Feb. 25 (12:30 p.m. Central)


Men's Singles (Friday Matches/Results)

Open
Open (9-16)
A1
A2
A3
B1
B2
B3

C1
C2

Women's Singles (Friday Matches/Results)

Open
Open (9-16)
A1
A2
B1
B2

Men's Doubles

Open 
A
B

Women's Doubles

Open 
A
B

Men's Singles (First Matches)

Men 1-16
Men 17-32
Men 33-48
Men 49-64
Men 65-80
Men 81-96
Men 97-112
Men 113-128

Men's Singles (Thursday Matches/Results)

 

Open/A1
A1/A2
A2/A3
A3/B1
B1/B2
B2/B3
B3/C1
C1/C1

Women's Singles (First Matches)

Women 1-16
Women 17-32
Women 33-48
Women 49-64
Women 65-80

Women's Singles (Thursday Matches/Results)

 

Open/A1
A1/A2
A2/B1
B1/B2
B1/B2 (cont.)
B1/B2 X


2017 Results (65th USHA Collegiate Handball Championships) HERE.

Rules, Eligibility and Code of Conduct

Deadlines

  • Monday, February 19 - Starting Times and Draws Posted
  • February 21 (12 pm) - Play may begin
  • February 25-(12 pm) - Play ends
  • March 5 - All American Bios and Championship Articles due

Division names


The new naming conventions will be broken into Open, A, B, and C Divisions for the men and women draws. Each Division will contain a number of brackets based upon the number of players in a division.

Men

  • Open Division – Open Bracket
  • A Division – A1, A2, A3 Brackets
  • B Division – B1, B2, B3, Brackets
  • C Division – C1, C2, C3 Brackets


Women

  • Open Division– Open Bracket
  • A Division – A1, A2 Brackets
  • B Division – B1, B2 Brackets
  • C Division - C Bracket


To categorize teams for Open, A, or B team titles, you would take the AVERAGE of the players’ seeds. For the 2017 men’s draw, to find the three Divisions you would divide the total number of entrants by 3, e.g. 162 entrants / 3 = 54.

  • Open Division up to 54
  • A Division 55 – 108
  • B Division 109 - 162


To qualify for a team title, a school would still need to have a minimum of three players in a gender. Points would be calculated exactly how they were in 2017. The schools would have been divided as follows in the Men’s 2017 tournament using this method.

Points

Point Distribution

 

Format

  • Wall chart-Draws will be posted on the wall in a diamond shape to reflect where players move to as the players either win or lose in the first two rounds.
  • Women's Divisions (template)
  • Men's Divisions (template)

Maps

Meals

  • Location-TBD
  • Times- Thursday (TBD), Friday (TBD), Saturday (TBD)

Banquet

  • Location-TBD
  • Times-TBD

Coaches meetings

    • Welcome Meeting - Room 248 (Above Lobby) 11 a.m.
    • Times - TBD
    • Agendas - TBD

Awards

    • All Tournament -(semi and finalist Open division both genders)
    • All American-top 4 (or more in case of tie) American players in top 16 Singles or finalists of Open Doubles
    • Sportsmanship (both genders)
    • Most Improved Player (both genders based on 2017 finish/2018 finish)
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2018 USHA Hall of Fame Tournament

New! Videos uploaded...TUCSON, Ariz. -- Abe Montijo, coach and mentor for the Fred Lewis Foundation, showed the young ones how it's done on Sunday.  Montijo upset Braulio Ruiz to take the Open singles and team with Ruiz to win the doubles over two of his proteges, Pedro Murillo and Carlos Espinoza. 

Video has been posted for a number of matches, including the Open final. Click here: https://bracketace.com/wp/video/?tid=144

Ashley Moler beat Beth Blackstone for the Women's title and then fell just a bit short in the A singles final against Ivan Lugo.  Vinnie Natale emerged undefeated in the 40 singles as did Andy Wills and Jim Westerman in the 50 doubles.

It was a great weekend in the Old Pueblo with players enjoying the Saturday Evening Banquet at the Hall of Fame where Kelly Albers was presented the Marty Decatur Sportsmanship Award.  Next year, the Hall of Fame will celebrate its 25th anniversary and is looking to add the Masters singles and Women's Classic to the weekend's activity.

Many thanks to Charlie Wicker, Vince San Angelo and the Tucson Community for a great weekend.
Brackets and Results can be found on the tournaments BRACKET ACE HERE [Main Page]

SPECIAL THANKS TO THE TREMENDOUS SUPPORT RECEIVED BY OUR TOURNAMENT SPONSORS AND SUPPORTERS: 

Fred Banfield
Charlie Wicker
Fred Lewis
Carl Porter
David Vincent – WPH
Joe Wright
Doug Clark
Brian Wessel
Joe Wright
Doug Clark
Brian Wessel
Jack Herbst
Ron Deriana
Paul Flasch    
Ron Kroll
Ken Hartnett
John Ross
Rich Stevens
Alex Jacome
Vince San Angelo
Pete Jorgensen
Bob Henry
John Stalder
Andy Onate
Don Wharton
Steve Sheldon
Jack Herbst
Ron Deriana
Paul Flasch    
Ron Kroll
Ken Hartnett
Kam Nassar
Larry Lenning
Leo Carrillo
       


 




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2018 USHA National Masters Singles

 

SAN DIEGO -- Tommy Hynes of Wexford brought raw power and determination to the 45 singles final against Chris Watkins.  Watkins had beaten Hynes the last time they met but Hynes' was on top of his game on Sunday, racing to the title. George Garcia Jr. showed up healthy on Sunday and ready to play two finals. Kevin Price had a rough night and didn't know if he could take the court after tough wins on Saturday.  Garcia eased his way to the 35 title and Price wasn't able to take the court for the 40s.  Mike McDonald earned the 50 title over Ryan Grossenbacher in a tiebreaker.  Bobby Nicholas overcame a determined Marty Clemens and a sore left arm to win the 55s.  Lloyd Garcia earned his 9th title in his quest for the Grand Master sweater over Dave Streibig in three games.  Billy Wyrsch turned back Bob Lohmueller in yet another tiebreaker for the 65s.  In the 70s, Greg Raya showed he's still the one to beat, taking Greg Stansbury in two games.  Jim Smith won the battle of the dentists over Gary Rohrer in the 75s.  Mike Driscoll moved into the 80s for his first win in that group, beating Jerry White in the final.

 

See the final results of the 2018 USHA National Masters Singles Draws on r2sports HERE.

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